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Care's Biomedical Services

Food Allergy Testing

Individuals who suffer from diarrhea, constipation, asthma, eczema, irritability, distractibility, depression, nasal congestion, sleep disturbances, ear infections, and/or hyperactivity are sometimes reacting to specific foods in their diet. Traditional skin testing identifies clear-cut food allergies that cause immediate physical reactions such as hives or breathing difficulty. Some allergy responses are more delayed in nature and, therefore, more difficult to detect. Delayed food allergies may be identified through either an elimination diet or by a blood test. CARE recommends the identification of allergies and sensitivities through lymphocyte stimulation testing, a computerized technique for measuring the response of lymphocytes (white blood cells) to 100 foods and 30 food additives and environmental chemicals.

Vitamin Levels

Folic acid, B12, vitamin A (retinol and retinyl palmitate), Vitamin E (alpha, delta, and gamma tocopherols), coenzyme Q10, and other vitamins may be measured to assess nutritional status.

Red Blood Cell Fatty Acid Analysis

This test is a measurement of fatty acids in the red blood cell membrane, which may be used to guide essential fatty acid supplementation and identify the healthiest oils to use in cooking. Essential fatty acids are required for normal brain development, optimal cognitive function, attention, memory, healthy skin and joints, normal visual acuity, and intestinal health.

RBC Elements

Because the red blood cell has an average lifespan of 120 days, this form of testing gives a more accurate picture of an individual's nutritional status than serum or plasma testing, but is only performed in specialty laboratories. Dietary minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron, selenium, and magnesium are measured as well as toxic metals such as lead and mercury. Optimal management of dietary supplements requires this form of testing. It is also used during chelation to assure that important minerals such as zinc and selenium do not become depleted.

Hormone Assessments

Males: Free and total testosterone, estradiol, DHEA-sulfate, IGF-1, and luteinizing hormone Females: Estradiol, estrone, follicle stimulating hormone, progesterone, free and total testosterone, IGF-1, and DHEA-sulfate

Diabetes Screening

Fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin levels

Heart Disease Risk

Total cholesterol, HDL with subtypes, LDL, triglycerides, C reactive protein, methylmalonic acid, and homocysteine levels are helpful in assessing an individual's risk of heart disease. Genetic testing for genes associated with a higher risk of heart disease is also available.

Anti-gliadin IgG and IgA / anti-reticulin antibodies

These tests investigate the possibility of gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. Many individuals have undiagnosed allergies to gluten, a component of wheat and many other grains, and suffer needlessly from diarrhea, intestinal pain, and diminished absorption of nutrients. Most can be symptom free with dietary changes and nutritional guidance.

Metabolic Analysis Profile

This urine test measures markers of intestinal yeast or bacterial overgrowth as well as organic acids, energy metabolites, markers for B12 and folic acid levels, amino acid metabolites, and breakdown products from the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and epinephrine. It provides a broad overview of metabolism and assists in identifying areas that might require further treatment.

Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis

This is best performed by specialty laboratories, but can be done through local labs if necessary. A three-day stool collection is obtained to rule out yeast, bacterial, and parasitic infections. It can also be used to identify intestinal inflammation and problems with digestion. Specialty laboratories are able to test for calprotectin, a marker for intestinal inflammation, and for eosinophil protein X, which is elevated when this inflammation is due to food allergies and/or an autoimmune process.

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

This is a test to rule out anemia and other blood disorders. White blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets are quantified to insure that normal numbers are present. Abnormalities in this test are often seen in infections, iron deficiency, and other medical conditions.

Chemistry Panel

A commonly ordered screening test to assess liver and kidney function and overall health. Most include a lipid profile, which measures total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride levels. Results are most informative when this test is drawn while fasting.

Urine Toxic and Essential Elements

Nutritional status and exposure to harmful environmental toxins such as lead and mercury may be assessed both before and after chelation challenge.

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

An underactive thyroid may impair a child's ability to learn. Other symptoms may include fatigue, muscle aches, poor concentration, weight gain, cold intolerance, and hair loss. This condition is easily treated, and should be ruled out in any child with developmental delays or any adult with the symptoms described.

Plasma Amino Acids

This test is usually ordered to investigate developmental delays or unusual medical concerns. Many inherited metabolic disorders can be identified by this test, but most developmental delays are not associated with any known metabolic disorder. Nutritional status is often monitored with amino acid testing and amino acid supplements are sometimes necessary when protein intake is poor.

Iron Status

The Red Blood Cell Elements test measures iron and other essential nutrients, but additional information may be obtained from ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and hemoglobin levels.

Urinalysis

Routine testing screens for sugar, which may be elevated in diabetics, white blood cells and others markers of infection, protein, which is elevated when certain kidney diseases are present, and ketones, which rise in some disease states and when nutritional intake is suboptimal.

Immune System Testing

Total serum IgG with subclasses, total serum IgA, and total serum IgE levels are helpful in evaluating an individual's ability to fight infection. If indicated by history, testing for viral infections such as Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes viruses, and measles virus may be advised. Some clients wish to measure antibody titers to determine whether or not further vaccination is necessary, as most children respond to early childhood immunizations in a robust manner and have no need for booster immunizations at kindergarten.

Screening for Autoimmune Diseases

When unusual physical findings are present, screening for autoimmune diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and other autoimmune diseases may be indicated. Tests vary according to the condition suspected, but may include antinuclear antibodies, anti-myelin antibodies, anti-neurofilament protein antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-thyroid antibodies, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and HLA typing.

Pre-Pregnancy Testing

Women anticipating pregnancy in the near future may choose to undergo testing to rule out certain conditions that could complicate pregnancy. This is of particular importance to women with a family history of autism, attention deficit disorder, multiple food allergies, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, thyroid disease, or birth defects. A general assessment of nutritional status and overall health should include a CBC, chemistry panel, urinalysis, mineral levels, markers for folic acid and B12 metabolism, thyroid function, a homocysteine level, and essential fatty acid analysis. A review of current medications and supplements is strongly advised, as some are contraindicated in pregnancy and/or potentially associated with birth defects. Others are critical in minimizing the risk of certain birth defects and other devastating medical conditions. Current dietary habits, exercise routines, tobacco and alcohol use, occupational and environmental exposures, and family history should also be discussed in detail.

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Profiles and Labs

For the convenience of our patients, all of our lab collections (incl. blood, urine, saliva and smears) are performed in-house and are usually collected within minutes after ordering. This avoids inconvenient travelling to outside labs and diagnostic centers. The following lab tests and profiles are available:

Food Allergy Testing

Individuals who suffer from diarrhea, constipation, asthma, eczema, irritability, distractibility, depression, nasal congestion, sleep disturbances, ear infections, and/or hyperactivity are sometimes reacting to specific foods in their diet. Traditional skin testing identifies clear-cut food allergies that cause immediate physical reactions such as hives or breathing difficulty. Some allergy responses are more delayed in nature and, therefore, more difficult to detect. Delayed food allergies may be identified through either an elimination diet or by a blood test. CARE recommends the identification of allergies and sensitivities through lymphocyte stimulation testing, a computerized technique for measuring the response of lymphocytes (white blood cells) to 100 foods and 30 food additives and environmental chemicals.

Vitamin Levels

Folic acid, B12, vitamin A (retinol and retinyl palmitate), Vitamin E (alpha, delta, and gamma tocopherols), coenzyme Q10, and other vitamins may be measured to assess nutritional status.

Red Blood Cell Fatty Acid Analysis

This test is a measurement of fatty acids in the red blood cell membrane, which may be used to guide essential fatty acid supplementation and identify the healthiest oils to use in cooking. Essential fatty acids are required for normal brain development, optimal cognitive function, attention, memory, healthy skin and joints, normal visual acuity, and intestinal health.

RBC Elements

Because the red blood cell has an average lifespan of 120 days, this form of testing gives a more accurate picture of an individual's nutritional status than serum or plasma testing, but is only performed in specialty laboratories. Dietary minerals such as calcium, zinc, iron, selenium, and magnesium are measured as well as toxic metals such as lead and mercury. Optimal management of dietary supplements requires this form of testing. It is also used during chelation to assure that important minerals such as zinc and selenium do not become depleted.

Hormone Assessments

Males: Free and total testosterone, estradiol, DHEA-sulfate, IGF-1, and luteinizing hormone Females: Estradiol, estrone, follicle stimulating hormone, progesterone, free and total testosterone, IGF-1, and DHEA-sulfate

Diabetes Screening

Fasting blood glucose, hemoglobin A1c, and insulin levels

Heart Disease Risk

Total cholesterol, HDL with subtypes, LDL, triglycerides, C reactive protein, methylmalonic acid, and homocysteine levels are helpful in assessing an individual's risk of heart disease. Genetic testing for genes associated with a higher risk of heart disease is also available.

Anti-gliadin IgG and IgA / anti-reticulin antibodies

These tests investigate the possibility of gluten sensitivity or celiac disease. Many individuals have undiagnosed allergies to gluten, a component of wheat and many other grains, and suffer needlessly from diarrhea, intestinal pain, and diminished absorption of nutrients. Most can be symptom free with dietary changes and nutritional guidance.

Metabolic Analysis Profile

This urine test measures markers of intestinal yeast or bacterial overgrowth as well as organic acids, energy metabolites, markers for B12 and folic acid levels, amino acid metabolites, and breakdown products from the neurotransmitters dopamine, serotonin, and epinephrine. It provides a broad overview of metabolism and assists in identifying areas that might require further treatment.

Comprehensive Digestive Stool Analysis

This is best performed by specialty laboratories, but can be done through local labs if necessary. A three-day stool collection is obtained to rule out yeast, bacterial, and parasitic infections. It can also be used to identify intestinal inflammation and problems with digestion. Specialty laboratories are able to test for calprotectin, a marker for intestinal inflammation, and for eosinophil protein X, which is elevated when this inflammation is due to food allergies and/or an autoimmune process.

Complete Blood Count (CBC)

This is a test to rule out anemia and other blood disorders. White blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets are quantified to insure that normal numbers are present. Abnormalities in this test are often seen in infections, iron deficiency, and other medical conditions.

Chemistry Panel

A commonly ordered screening test to assess liver and kidney function and overall health. Most include a lipid profile, which measures total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglyceride levels. Results are most informative when this test is drawn while fasting.

Urine Toxic and Essential Elements

Nutritional status and exposure to harmful environmental toxins such as lead and mercury may be assessed both before and after chelation challenge.

Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH)

An underactive thyroid may impair a child's ability to learn. Other symptoms may include fatigue, muscle aches, poor concentration, weight gain, cold intolerance, and hair loss. This condition is easily treated, and should be ruled out in any child with developmental delays or any adult with the symptoms described.

Plasma Amino Acids

This test is usually ordered to investigate developmental delays or unusual medical concerns. Many inherited metabolic disorders can be identified by this test, but most developmental delays are not associated with any known metabolic disorder. Nutritional status is often monitored with amino acid testing and amino acid supplements are sometimes necessary when protein intake is poor.

Iron Status

The Red Blood Cell Elements test measures iron and other essential nutrients, but additional information may be obtained from ferritin, total iron binding capacity, and hemoglobin levels.

Urinalysis

Routine testing screens for sugar, which may be elevated in diabetics, white blood cells and others markers of infection, protein, which is elevated when certain kidney diseases are present, and ketones, which rise in some disease states and when nutritional intake is suboptimal.

Immune System Testing

Total serum IgG with subclasses, total serum IgA, and total serum IgE levels are helpful in evaluating an individual's ability to fight infection. If indicated by history, testing for viral infections such as Epstein Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes viruses, and measles virus may be advised. Some clients wish to measure antibody titers to determine whether or not further vaccination is necessary, as most children respond to early childhood immunizations in a robust manner and have no need for booster immunizations at kindergarten.

Screening for Autoimmune Diseases

When unusual physical findings are present, screening for autoimmune diseases such as lupus, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, and other autoimmune diseases may be indicated. Tests vary according to the condition suspected, but may include antinuclear antibodies, anti-myelin antibodies, anti-neurofilament protein antibodies, rheumatoid factor, anti-thyroid antibodies, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and HLA typing.

Pre-Pregnancy Testing

Women anticipating pregnancy in the near future may choose to undergo testing to rule out certain conditions that could complicate pregnancy. This is of particular importance to women with a family history of autism, attention deficit disorder, multiple food allergies, heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, thyroid disease, or birth defects. A general assessment of nutritional status and overall health should include a CBC, chemistry panel, urinalysis, mineral levels, markers for folic acid and B12 metabolism, thyroid function, a homocysteine level, and essential fatty acid analysis. A review of current medications and supplements is strongly advised, as some are contraindicated in pregnancy and/or potentially associated with birth defects. Others are critical in minimizing the risk of certain birth defects and other devastating medical conditions. Current dietary habits, exercise routines, tobacco and alcohol use, occupational and environmental exposures, and family history should also be discussed in detail.

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